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> Does anyone rebuild AARs professionally?
Tdskip
post Jan 11 2019, 10:18 AM
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I’m starting to think the 731.7 FI car has a wonky AAR, still need to do more testing to make sure, but that led me to wonder if anyone rebuilds these professionally for us?

Sorry if this is common knowledge and I just haven’t caught up with y’all yet.
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dr914@autoatlanta.com
post Jan 11 2019, 11:21 AM
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yes
QUOTE(Tdskip @ Jan 11 2019, 09:18 AM) *

I’m starting to think the 731.7 FI car has a wonky AAR, still need to do more testing to make sure, but that led me to wonder if anyone rebuilds these professionally for us?

Sorry if this is common knowledge and I just haven’t caught up with y’all yet.

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Tdskip
post Jan 11 2019, 11:28 AM
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What if I only need one?

;-)


Thanks, as always, George.
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Dave_Darling
post Jan 11 2019, 12:45 PM
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They are not that hard to repair at home, though. The can part crimps over the lid that holds the pipes. The metal of the can is a bit thick, but it can definitely be pried back. You can then pull the top, containing the moving bits, out of the can. Lubricate it and work it a bit and it should free up.

If the resistance wire in the base of the can is broken, that's a little more involved. You can replace it with a 1-watt ~15-ohm resistor, if you can find one that fits in the space available. One end of the resistor would be attached to the can itself, the other would be attached to a wire that comes through the can, but is insulated from the can.

If the bimetallic spring is broken, or if you cannot free up the rotary valve, then replace the whole thing.

--DD
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dr914@autoatlanta.com
post Jan 11 2019, 01:09 PM
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we use a new modern heating element that is bulletproof



QUOTE(Dave_Darling @ Jan 11 2019, 11:45 AM) *

They are not that hard to repair at home, though. The can part crimps over the lid that holds the pipes. The metal of the can is a bit thick, but it can definitely be pried back. You can then pull the top, containing the moving bits, out of the can. Lubricate it and work it a bit and it should free up.

If the resistance wire in the base of the can is broken, that's a little more involved. You can replace it with a 1-watt ~15-ohm resistor, if you can find one that fits in the space available. One end of the resistor would be attached to the can itself, the other would be attached to a wire that comes through the can, but is insulated from the can.

If the bimetallic spring is broken, or if you cannot free up the rotary valve, then replace the whole thing.

--DD

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GregAmy
post Jan 11 2019, 01:29 PM
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QUOTE(dr914@autoatlanta.com @ Jan 11 2019, 02:09 PM) *
we use a new modern heating element that is bulletproof

What's the amperage draw on these?

I just think it's so inefficient that the default position on these is normally open, such that you have to maintain a constant current draw to keep it closed...and that if the current fails, it fails open. A timer relay to hold open a normally-closed valve for a set amount of time seems a much better idea.

Then again, it's simple, and we are talking late 60s/early 70s technology...and in the end, I doubt it has a significant affect on fuel economy or alternator life.
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