Home  |  Forums  |  914 Info  |  Blogs
 
914World.com - The fastest growing online 914 community!
 
Porsche, and the Porsche crest are registered trademarks of Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG. This site is not affiliated with Porsche in any way.
Its only purpose is to provide an online forum for car enthusiasts. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.
 

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> broken stud on 914-6 oil tank
dwelle
post Jan 12 2021, 04:23 PM
Post #1


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 10
Joined: 24-December 16
From: a town south of fresno
Member No.: 20,693
Region Association: None



i had to pull the oil tank out of my 914 to address a leak, and one of the mounting studs on the tank broke when i went to remove the nut. it broke about a 1/4" off of the tank.

quick google search last night didn't yield any good intel, what am i looking at to replace that stud?...
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
johnhora
post Jan 12 2021, 04:57 PM
Post #2


Senior Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 677
Joined: 7-January 03
From: Derby City KY
Member No.: 107
Region Association: None



you're talking about this in the drawing below...correct?
if so may need to weld another one on....
how much is left on the tank
take a picture and we can see what to address
I'm sure someone on here has done it on a 6 tank or on a 911 tank

Attached Image
User is online!Profile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
dwelle
post Jan 12 2021, 06:16 PM
Post #3


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 10
Joined: 24-December 16
From: a town south of fresno
Member No.: 20,693
Region Association: None



yes, the stud on the right hand side of that diagram is the one that broke. there is only 1/4" or so left on the tank.

i can feel the back of the other stud and it feels almost like it's pressed in from the back side...
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Root_Werks
post Jan 12 2021, 06:22 PM
Post #4


When I set my timing, why do I flush, then take a pee?
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 6,789
Joined: 25-May 04
From: About 5NM from Canada
Member No.: 2,105
Region Association: Pacific Northwest



If there's enough thread, you might be able to use a stud extender. Might have to put an extra washer or two on the engine bay side. But it would be an easy fix if it's possible.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
PanelBilly
post Jan 12 2021, 06:32 PM
Post #5


914 Guru
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 5,172
Joined: 23-July 06
From: Kent, Wa
Member No.: 6,488
Region Association: Pacific Northwest



Attached Image
User is online!Profile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
dwelle
post Jan 12 2021, 06:46 PM
Post #6


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 10
Joined: 24-December 16
From: a town south of fresno
Member No.: 20,693
Region Association: None



yeah, there isn't enough of the stud left, and the threads are jacked anyhow.

i'll likely have another welded on?...
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
johnhora
post Jan 12 2021, 07:35 PM
Post #7


Senior Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 677
Joined: 7-January 03
From: Derby City KY
Member No.: 107
Region Association: None



You could try to cut the old one flush at the base and then drill and tap the hole for a new stud. Being carful not to drill thru into the tank.
User is online!Profile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Mark Henry
post Jan 13 2021, 08:41 AM
Post #8


that's what I do!
***************

Group: Members
Posts: 19,146
Joined: 27-December 02
From: Port Hope, Ontario
Member No.: 26
Region Association: Canada



Or carefully weld a new stud on. I've done this before but not on a tank.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
gereed75
post Jan 13 2021, 10:21 AM
Post #9


Senior Member
***

Group: Members
Posts: 905
Joined: 19-March 13
From: Pittsburgh PA
Member No.: 15,674
Region Association: North East States



Maybe take a bolt with the same tread, grind the head to about .080" thick. Grind the broken stud flat to the tank. Mig the modified bolt/stud to the tank.

That is what I would try. The extra material provided by the ground head would make it easier, less risky to weld. You could push the puddle formed by the hot head metal to flow into the tank wall material for good penetration without burning through the tank wall. The threads would be clean all the way down the stud to the weld, where as when welding a stud to the broken stud you would have to chase the threads down onto the old stud to get a full threaded stud. Possible but a bit risky and a lot of work.

be sure that if you try this to grind off the copper plating that is on the tank. Welding through the copper would ruin the weld.

But that is just my opinion and I am a semi-skilled rank amateur.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
aturboman
post Jan 13 2021, 10:54 AM
Post #10


Member
**

Group: Members
Posts: 71
Joined: 18-October 11
From: CA
Member No.: 13,687
Region Association: None



I've fixed this problem before on 911 tanks. You'll need to carefully grind the broken stud flush to the the tank and clean the area to bare metal.

The only proper way to re-attached a stud to metal this thin is to carefully braze a new stud on and it will be as strong as the original

The tank is too thin for electric welding in my opinion even TIG is a challenge due to the vast differences in material thickness.

Also getting rid of all the oil or rust contamination for a proper electric weld is near impossible, brazing is much more tolerant in that regard.

User is online!Profile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
rgalla9146
post Jan 13 2021, 01:01 PM
Post #11


Advanced Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 3,470
Joined: 23-November 05
From: Paramus NJ
Member No.: 5,176
Region Association: None



QUOTE(aturboman @ Jan 13 2021, 11:54 AM) *

I've fixed this problem before on 911 tanks. You'll need to carefully grind the broken stud flush to the the tank and clean the area to bare metal.

The only proper way to re-attached a stud to metal this thin is to carefully braze a new stud on and it will be as strong as the original

The tank is too thin for electric welding in my opinion even TIG is a challenge due to the vast differences in material thickness.

Also getting rid of all the oil or rust contamination for a proper electric weld is near impossible, brazing is much more tolerant in that regard.


(IMG:style_emoticons/default/agree.gif) This method done with either welding technique is the way to go.
BUT.... evaluation of the attachment is area is imperative.
A trusted, experienced welder can do this....or suggest other remedies.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
dwelle
post Jan 13 2021, 02:36 PM
Post #12


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 10
Joined: 24-December 16
From: a town south of fresno
Member No.: 20,693
Region Association: None



ok, thanks. i'm not going to attempt to weld this one myself. time to call in some friends with better skills than i...
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Cairo94507
post Jan 13 2021, 02:46 PM
Post #13


Michael
*****

Group: Members
Posts: 7,298
Joined: 1-November 08
From: San Ramon Valley, CA
Member No.: 9,712
Region Association: Northern California



Personally, I would email @mb911 and explain what happened and send him a picture and see if he could repair it if you shipped it to him. I would want it repaired correctly with a new stud. (IMG:style_emoticons/default/beerchug.gif)
User is online!Profile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
mepstein
post Jan 13 2021, 02:50 PM
Post #14


914-6 GT in waiting
***************

Group: Members
Posts: 15,849
Joined: 19-September 09
From: Landenberg, PA/Wilmington, DE
Member No.: 10,825
Region Association: MidAtlantic Region



(IMG:style_emoticons/default/agree.gif) someone with the right skills will repair it correctly.
User is online!Profile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
dwelle
post Jan 13 2021, 03:58 PM
Post #15


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 10
Joined: 24-December 16
From: a town south of fresno
Member No.: 20,693
Region Association: None



QUOTE(Cairo94507 @ Jan 13 2021, 12:46 PM) *

Personally, I would email @mb911 and explain what happened and send him a picture and see if he could repair it if you shipped it to him. I would want it repaired correctly with a new stud. (IMG:style_emoticons/default/beerchug.gif)


good idea, thanks...
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
mb911
post Jan 13 2021, 05:49 PM
Post #16


Advanced Member
****

Group: Members
Posts: 4,808
Joined: 2-January 09
From: Burlington wi
Member No.: 9,892
Region Association: Upper MidWest



Thats a tricky spot for sure.. that stud is brazed with a flange from the inside..That will be a tricky repair. A couple ways to go about it.. I think the best way would be to drill and tap then insert a stud and weld or brake in place. That will ensure proper centering.
User is online!Profile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
mepstein
post Jan 13 2021, 06:12 PM
Post #17


914-6 GT in waiting
***************

Group: Members
Posts: 15,849
Joined: 19-September 09
From: Landenberg, PA/Wilmington, DE
Member No.: 10,825
Region Association: MidAtlantic Region



Is there a riv nut type of fitting that can be used.
User is online!Profile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
dwelle
post Jan 13 2021, 08:23 PM
Post #18


Newbie
*

Group: Members
Posts: 10
Joined: 24-December 16
From: a town south of fresno
Member No.: 20,693
Region Association: None



Attached Image

i'm not messing with this. otherwise, the tank is nice, i may just send it to ben...
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



- Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 27th January 2021 - 05:18 PM